Mark Schreiber

Crossarc Chute

CD (E148)

Belgium £13 (including postage)

Europe £15 (including postage)

Rest of world £17 (including postage)

Edition of 200 copies

Crossarc Chute was inspired by my interest in the compositional strategies adopted for the early analogue electronics of the 1950s and ’60s, 

yet using digital processes and my own adaptations. Starting with pulse sounds, predefined filtering techniques and

rules became the springboard from

which I was able to generate many

new sounds. These parameters formed

a kind of system from which I could at times deviate. For one piece, Detail II, 

I separated the frequency bands of 

a group of sounds and then reorganised

these minute segments. Curiously, this work ended up with a distinctive sound character when heard beside the 

other pieces.
— Mark Schreiber, May 2012

 

Mark Schreiber (1970, Johannesburg) works with sound and visual means 

to probe ideas surrounding language 

and systems. His practice includes performance, sound, installation, 

video, and an expanding interest in 

other visual forms. He has presented 

his work at Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt, 

Kai Middendorff Galerie (Frankfurt), 

Caribic Residency (Frankfurt), Fear of 

the Known, (South Africa), Singuhr Hörgalerie (Berlin), and Royal College 

of Art Galleries (London). His work

is represented by Kai Middendorff 

Galerie in Frankfurt. Schreiber studied sound and visual art in London and Weimar. He lives and works in Frankfurt.

Mastered by Andreas [LUPO] Lubich

at Dubplates & Mastering, Berlin

 

markschreiber.org



Review

Crossarc Chute’s four pieces use digital manipulation of pulse sounds to create austere arrangements of digital noise 

and high-pitched fizz and hiss. The final
track’s climax is all zapping lasers and synthetic wasp buzz; the subsequent near silence feels profoundly empty after the chaos that preceded it
, as if your
powers of hearing have cracked under the pressure.

Rory Gibb in The Wire

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Crossarc Chute (2012)

Black marker drawing by Mark Schreiber